Your Questions: Getting Paid Well For Wedding DJing

| Read time: 3 mins
wedding djing
Last updated 3 August, 2017

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Landing the best wedding DJ gigs and getting paid well for them is simply a case of knowing how to go about it, as we find out in today’s article.

Digital DJ Tips member Chris writes: “I’ve been DJing since I was 14 – 21 years now! Since the age of 16 I’ve been DJing regularly – initially in clubs, then transitioning to bar residencies, and now I almost exclusively do mobile DJing, primarily weddings. I target higher-end weddings where I provide a full service from the ceremony to the reception.

“I get a lot of email enquiries requesting a quote for X, Y and Z, and I rarely give this as I think it’s best to quote each function individually. However, I’m conscious of potentially being seen as ‘evasive’ by some prospective clients, but at the same time this does seem to weed out ‘tyre kickers’ and those after a budget DJ.

“What are your thoughts regarding the best way and wording to respond to prospective clients? I have a few canned responses that I tailor – but though the collective experience and wisdom of Digital DJ Tips’s membership may have some other ideas?”

Digital DJ Tips says:

In any kind of sales, unless what you’re selling is a straight commodity (ie everyone else is selling the same thing, so it’s simply about price), then you’re right, the best way to proceed is always to show the value before giving the price. Especially in this case where – as you say – things ought to be customised depending on the individual situation, it is your obligation to do just that! Trouble is, many people (even those with a good budget to spend), 1. want to get a good deal, and 2. believe there’s essentially no difference between DJ A and DJ B. It’s usually just that they haven’t thought it through properly.

So to counteract this, apart from being highly professional to differentiate yourself in everything you do (quality of website, quality of communications with client etc), something along the lines of: “I can give you a quote if you want exactly the same thing the last couple who’s wedding I DJed wanted, but I am guessing you want your wedding to be special, exclusive and to reflect who you are as a couple?

“Since we haven’t met, it’s hard for me to estimate how you would like for your wedding to happen. Why don’t we get together, to meet in person and discuss your wishes and ideas? Then I will be able to give you a detailed quote.”

Get that meeting, be likeable, professional and authoritative (after all, you’ve done loads of weddings, you do know what you’re talking about), and only give a price after you’ve clearly outlined everything you’ll do for them – stuff they were hopefully nodding vigorously in agreement about wanting as you outlined it all at that meeting.

Oh, and finally, get a testimonial from everyone you do a great job for. Other people’s words always speak louder than yours when you’re selling the value in what you do.

• Want to be a wedding DJ? The Digital DJ Tips guide The Complete 21st Century Wedding DJ outlines step by-step how to build a profitable wedding business from scratch. Find out more here.

Are you a wedding DJ who’s had to battle on price with clients and struggles to convey the value in what you do? How did you conquer the situation? Got any more tips to add for Chris? Please do so in the comments.

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