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This topic contains 11 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Anthony Lewis 5 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #1016785

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    Hello all,

    So I have been DJing as a hobby for for the better part of a year. I enjoy playing Trance and have a pretty good handle on mixing I guess intro/outro. But obviously that kills a lot of energy. I have gotten better at using my eq’s (still learning though) but at what point should I start my mix to avoid the loss of energy? Should I phrase it so that the melody of the incoming song hits where the outro begins? I mean you know how today’s trance is, it seems most songs kick in after 32 or 64 bars and I just can’t seem to get it right.
    Thanks in advance for your advice.

    -Ant

    #1016795

    Terry_42
    Keymaster

    Mix an energetic part of song 1 into a part that is about 40-50 seconds into track 2.

    If you cannot do that, you need to practice beatmatching and starting the tracks in the right time.

    #1016913

    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    Depends on what flavors of trance you play.

    I like the more fast-paced energy stuff.  I’ll usually start the next track in the last 2 minutes of the track playing.  Most of the time the new tune kicks in when the old tune is letting go.

    Nowadays too many producers either change up their arrangement, or they seemingly do not get too DJ friendly…as I’ll be waiting for the tune to calm down…and it doesn’t.

    When I go to record a trance mix, I’ll set it all up in advance, looking for what tunes meld nicely together and when to start blending.  It helps you get to know your music better.

    #1016918

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    First and foremost, thank you Terry42 and D-Jam, you guys along with Chuck have always been a great resource for help to me.

    Now I will go on my rant (please feel free to correct me if I have any wrong info):

    What I find to be frustrating is that when I listen to some of the “Rockstar DJ/Producers” they seem to use their skills as producers to create these amazing sounding sets using edits of songs they made in the studio. Please forgive me but I don’t feel that is DJing. That is producing. It sounds real great and all but a typical dj cannot create that sound unless you have the programs and the production skills to do so. In my opinion, it has changed the entire club/festival scene. Now they are just playing edits and not doing much mixing. I might be a little old school because I feel as a dj you should play the music and build a groove on the dance floor, not just play the “big” parts of songs. I personally like to dance to the dance music and with all of this edit playing shit going on, it seems all people can do is fist pump and jump up and down. Whack!! is what it is. It sounds great and all but I just feel it has changed what people expect of a dj. Okay, I am done now. I do feel a little better having said that. So D, I agre with you about prepping the set. I do in fact do that.

    Please visit my mixcloud page. I have a mix posted there and would love some feedback. It is Mixcloud.com/anthonylewis.

    Thanks all!! Have a great holiday and safe Holiday season!!!

     

    #1016919

    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    I hate to burst your bubble, but this is nothing new.

    The Hot Mix 5 would make their radio mixes in their home studios with reel to reel tape and cutters.  They believed in giving the listener the “meat” of a tune without the fluff and filler.

    I’ve seen DJs for years make studio-edited mixes for radio and other media like this as well.  I’ve seen DJs who remix and edit their tunes for club use.  Many would do a 32 beat intro, the main meat, repeat, and then a 32 beat outro.  AGAIN…DJs have been remixing their tunes for club use since the beginning.

    Like it or not, in order to grow into the big leagues, you need to be more than just a guy playing music.  Especially in trance it’s highly competitive, and thus the winners are those who become branding and marketing powerhouses.  PvD would make many special edits/remixes of the tunes he would play, now he’s more just playing pieces and loops with live performance.

    It’s just the way of things.  I like playing the music as well, but the crowd wants instant gratification.  Win the crowd and you win in this game.  This is part of why I stay a hobbyist DJ.

    #1016921

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    Well said D. I agree with you on all counts. I just miss when the music and the scene as a whole was still underground. I enjoy playing the music for me, how I like it to sound. I too enjoy being a hobbyist DJ. I never want to view it as work. I think all the fun and enjoyment would be gone of that were the case. I enjoy making mixes for my friends and fam, and getting their feedback as well. I just needed to vent a bit.

    #1016932

    Terry_42
    Keymaster

    Trance has not been underground for ages… and Armin van Buuren was elected best DJ for a few years now…

    But I still enjoy good trance and even some mainstream trance (last AvB album was not too bad, liked Intense) and like to mix it up.

    #1016942

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    I like AVB and Markus Schulz. I enjoy playing their music. I from the old school, before there were all of these genres of music. I had the pleasure of going to one of the last storm raves by Frankie bones. The music is still good but some of these producers just plain suck. A lot of the music sounds the same. i am pretty selective of what tracks I buy. It can take me some time when I crate dig. I have started to mix in some techno tracks as well. They work nicely with trance. What type of music is your go to genre terry?

    #1016966

    Silvercue Master
    Participant

    if you don’t want to lose the energy you just need to get the track order right and make sure one hook line its at exactly the sweet spot between tracks that are beautiful together.  the sweet spot makes the intro/outro invisible.

    And don’t think the world is taking short cuts.  Some DJs maybe, but the majority of Djs are not spinning their own tunes or reprints they have remixed for convenience.  The best DJs play real tracks you or I can get hold of…they may get a lot that are not in available when they play them and some that never are, but most of the time they are just playing the same type of track as you and me.

     

     

    #1016967

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    Hi silvercue,

    would I lower the volime on the outgoing track at that point or use the eq’s? I am still learning how to apply the eq’s.

    For the most part I get what you are saying, aside from the songs working well together, I should have them phrased correctly so that the sweet spot hits right at the same time as the outro. Correct?

    #1016968

    Silvercue Master
    Participant

    ant – there are a lot of different ways to mix.  Golden rule is get them in time and match them perfectly…then there are so many things you can do.

    What you are describing may be the right mix for 2 tracks and the wrong for another 2.  Some tracks will blend and build and make a new sound together – others create a neat cut off, some need bass lines to be switched…many, many options and no “one size fits all” answer.

    #1016971

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    Thank you silvercue. I am going to keep playing around with the various ways of mixing.

    Also, thanks for telling me that there are a lot of us that play the music the way we play it. I get a little disheartened when I listen to like Markus Schulz and cannot recreate that awesome sound.

     

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