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  • #37057
    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    Hello all, I am trying to figure out where to set my slope for smooth fades from one track to the other. I have it set to the left right now(not all the way) and am noticing that the outgoing track is losing volume too soon. And advice would be helpful and appreciated. Thanks much.

    #37058
    aaron altar
    Participant

    I would recommend using the volume faders instead of the crossfader for full control over this. I’ve never used a crossfader that is as smooth as I would like in this regard.

    #37061
    elmgroove
    Member

    Just to reiterate what rjwhite41 said, start using your volume faders for these kinds of transitions. You have a LOT more control this way.

    IMO, the crossfader should only be used for cutting/scratching and maybe hard-cut transitions.

    #37062
    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    Thank you both. I will try ising them today. I play mostly house and progressive house and I like to keep the transitions as smooth as possible. I don’t do any scratching at all. So when using the volume faders, what level do you bring the incoming track on?

    #37063
    DJ Vintage
    Moderator

    Although I use the x-fader on occassion (it does free one hand and the curve is pretty well definable on my X1600), my tip would be to make sure that you have the main output level meter up when starting your mix. I am a sound guy too and “0 dB rules!”. So while preparing my mix, I make sure that the signal levels of outgoing and incoming channel are roughly the same (0 dB with max 3-6 dB peaks) on the channel input level meters. Then I check what level my main is outputting at, say -15 dB average. Then when I start the mix and messing with EQ and bringing in the new track, I keep an eye on my master output level to keep it around -15 dB. That way i can correct when necessary (for example lowering the volume of the outgoing track when I bring the bass of the incoming track back up). This way the total level of sound coming out of the main speakers will remain more or less the same.

    Obviously there is no substitute for being able to use your ears to do this, but the master output level will give you an immediate heads up when you are not sure and/or need confirmation of what your ears are telling you.

    Greetinx,
    C.

    #37097
    aaron altar
    Participant

    Ant_The_DJ, post: 37218, member: 7605 wrote: Thank you both. I will try ising them today. I play mostly house and progressive house and I like to keep the transitions as smooth as possible. I don’t do any scratching at all. So when using the volume faders, what level do you bring the incoming track on?

    I usually bring in a new track around 7, but it really depends on the track and the mix. It could be anywhere from 4-10. Remember to lower the volume of the first track according to how much you raise the volume of the second track that way you keep the overall volume roughly the same as stated above. When I have both tracks playing full I have the volumes around 8 for each channel (you could use the gains for this if you choose but I don’t usually). I’m pretty hungover this morning so if that doesn’t make sense let me know and I’ll try to explain better.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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