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Viewing 15 posts - 721 through 735 (of 738 total)
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  • Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    I don’t see it as “cheating”, but I do see it as “risky”.

    In the past we would see megamixes made and given to DJs.  They would contain tunes from one artist, or one label, or even just a megamix of big tunes of the moment.  I don’t see an issue making things like this to play in the club, especially if they do interesting production trickery to spice things up.

    Now…I say “risky” though because what do you do when one tune of your three-tune megamix is deemed “old” and “done”, and now you just cleared the floor?

    Seems like too much trouble to do all this outside of straight mixing.  I could see it as ideal for when you need to go to the bathroom.

    in reply to: Logo feedback #1015661
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    Based on your brief…

    I am a producer and produce Electro House music. I am seeking a logo that I can use for branding on club flyers, social media, artwork for cd covers, music videos, shirts, hats and so on.

    General:

    I would like to have a logo for the text and a symbol or icon that I can use without the logo (ex. on CD:s, hats and so on[for example Protocol Radio, Ultra Music Festival, Tiesto, Deadmou5]).

    Target audience:

    30 years and younger, male & female, electronic music lovers.

    I’d pick Schmoff Design.  I’d have him take this logo:

     

    and make the “R” more like the one in this logo…so it reads like an “R” and not a “D”

     

    I like the one with the disc because it does say “electro house”, “EDM”, or “dance music.  The disc gives it interest, especially on the “5”.  My only dislike is that R, as it looks more like a D.  If it had the R in the second logo, then it would be PERFECT.

    in reply to: New Book #1015365
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    I’ll read it.

    in reply to: DJing a Halloween party #1015364
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    in reply to: Help I have never used cdjs #1015204
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    CDJ is a bigger version of a platter on most midi controls.  You press on the top and you can scratch…on the side and you can bend the pitch.

    Think of it that way and you’ll be fine.  You can manually beatmatch so you should be solid.

    in reply to: How to make a great set (progressive house) #1015065
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    In most deep house, trance, tech house, and progressive house, the last two minutes are the sweet spot.  Many producers will make 2-minute intros and outros that are 1 to 1 1/2 minutes long.

    I just noticed when I start blending at the last two minutes, the next song just “kicks in” when the other song lets off into basic beats.  Keeps the dead spots from happening in most cases.

    With electro house, you get maybe 1 minute, or none (I hate that!).

    in reply to: How to make a great set (progressive house) #1014948
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    Here are my tips:

    1. [b]Have a diverse selection of music in the sound/vibe you wish to play.[/b] That means you might pick up tunes that Nervo and Hardwell play, but you also are seeking out stuff that fits in, but they don’t play. That’s part of how you build your own sound.

    2. [b]Plan out a mix you’re going to record.[/b] I’ve never been a fan of planning out mixes you play in clubs/events, but I am when it’s for a recording. You explore your music more, and try to find tunes that meld nicely together.

    3. [b]Try to take listeners on a journey.[/b] I usually like to explode out with something in the beginning, then continue the intensity in the second tune. By the third or fourth tune I’m bringing it down a bit, then back up later. You don’t want too much energy/explosive in a mix because people will turn it off…but you don’t want it to get boring.

    4. [b]Try to minimize “dead spots”.[/b] Seen some guys who blend in off the end (nothing wrong with that), but they will do things on the tail end, and then while you just heard 1-2 minutes of outro, you now are then hearing 1-2 more minutes of intro. So that’s 3-4 minutes of “dead time” as you wait for things to pick up. I usually try to place things so when one tune lets off, the next one kicks in.

    5. [b]Use tunes with vocals to break up the monotony of instrumentals.[/b] I see way too many DJs play 60-80 minutes of instrumentals, and then wonder why folks were bored. Vocal tunes add a human element to your music, so they can break things up and hand people a “lifeline” to Earth…before you take them into more instrumentals.

    6. [b]Don’t be afraid to dig in the crates.[/b] Too many DJs will stick to only playing “new”, but the best DJs in history (even progressive house ones) will play all over. It’ll be 40 minutes into a 60-minute set and suddenly that DJ drops [i]GIv Me Luv[/i] by Alcatraz, or [i]Altered States[/i] by Ron Trent, or some old tune from Underwold or Infusion…and people go nuts in a live setting. Do the same in your recorded mixes so you show diversity and a sense of history.

    It makes you stand apart. I’ve always heard the saying [i]”Anyone can come play 25 new promos they just acquired, but a talented DJ will rock a crowd with 20-30 years of great music.”[/i]

    in reply to: Uploading To Soundcloud? #1014943
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    I would still push you all not to upload mixes on SoundCloud. Use Mixcloud, Mixcrate, and/or reverbnation.

    SoundCloud often deletes DJ mixes…as they want to be the place where you upload tracks.

    in reply to: "Finding my sound" #1014702
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    I think if you have passion and really want to explore the genre beyond the typical Top-40 hits, then it’s all the more worth it. I’ve generally thought of DJs as people who become experts on a sound. They’re the ones (in your case) who might listen to the popular stuff, but they’re also digging and listening to the not-so-known sounds and thus introducing them to crowds.

    In terms of “finding your sound”, this takes time. When I started in 1991, I was mainly using old Bad Boy Bill hot mix cassettes as a source of new music to go look for. It wasn’t until a few years later that my brother suggested I start exploring beyond those mix cassettes.

    I first would play tunes that Bill didn’t…but sounded like he would. Then I’d suddenly look at B-Sides and even promos I had received (I was in a record pool at the time) and would find points where they did fit into my stuff.

    Over time, this exploration took me further and further from what Bill was doing, plus now I had started listening to other DJs and gaining inspiration from their sounds and techniques. This mish-mash of styles, sounds, and ideas became “my sound”. You will eventually do the same.

    You don’t have to be a turntablist or controllerist to do hip-hop, but I will say knowing some “oooh” and “ahhh” tricks can separate you from the who just play music. You more though need to know how to find new stuff as well as craft playlists that normal people can get into. If you notice, the “hip-hop” played in many clubs isn’t the same as what the hardcore fans call “hip=hop”.

    I’d also suggest you look into remix services like Crooklyn Clan for more “DJ friendly” versions of the tunes you want. These are people who also think the stuff put out by the labels isn’t very easy to DJ with, so they made their own remixes.

    in reply to: Music #1014593
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    First off, I would tell you to listen to the radio in your neck of the woods. Your Top 20 might be different than mine.

    I’d look at the charts on iTunes and Beatport if you’re seeking pop music.

    Naming names won’t help. You need to seek out what the popular tunes are in your area and then go from there.

    in reply to: Transition Tracks.. How do i beatgrid them? #1014592
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    I’d probably suggest you perfect manual beatmatching in this case.

    I use sync, but this is one of those occasions where it won’t work well.

    in reply to: Djs In India #1014591
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    Is there still a big Goa and Bhangra scene out there?

    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    I’d mainly tell you to try demos and find the one where your workflow fits in.

    I tried Ableton Live for house and breaks…became a misery for me because it’s such a beast. When I used Sony Acid, I found myself more easily putting things together, so I stayed with it.

    in reply to: Are Serato making bad choices with Serato DJ? #1014510
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    I agree with Terry. I have my nice, new Thinkpad to use…and while I do put my design software on it, I keep bloat off.

    In the end with Serato though, I’m sure right now there are “suits” pushing them to put more stuff out to sell over fixing bugs. Such is the life of many companies out there. 🙁

    in reply to: Music selection for a mix sent to promoters #1014509
    Alex Moschopoulos
    Participant

    I wrote an article on this you might find helpful:

    http://www.digitaldjtips.com/2011/05/how-to-succeed-at-djing-demo-mixtape-press-kit/

    I’ll agree many promoters aren’t going to listen to a whole demo. Many will listen to the first few blends to make sure you can technically mix, then shuffle through the rest of the disc or file to see what you’re playing.

    I personally think you should make your demo sound like your style, BUT also custom-make it to fit that promoter’s NEED. So if you know he needs opening DJs for his bigger headliners, then don’t hand him a demo full of prime time bangers. If you want to make that kind of a mix, make it for your fans…but handing a promoter that will only show you don’t know how to open.

    Also bear in mind now that many promoters are going to think less about your “talent” or “skill” and look more into your POPULARITY. Too many will take in a mediocre DJ if he/she will bring people out, even as an opener.

    http://www.digitaldjtips.com/2011/03/how-to-succeed-at-djing-part-2-play-the-popularity-game/

    It’s not to say you’re hopeless if you have no following, but this also speaks volumes as to why you should custom-make the demo to that promoter. Also be sure to visit his/her night on a regular basis. Get to know the night, the regulars, and especially the sound. You pumping a mix that doesn’t fit their vibe won’t help you no matter how good it sounds.

    http://www.digitaldjtips.com/2011/04/how-to-succeed-at-djing-part-3-get-involved-in-your-scene/

Viewing 15 posts - 721 through 735 (of 738 total)