Home Forums The DJ Booth Recording using NS6 and Garageband

This topic contains 8 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Anthony Lewis 6 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #41383

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    Hello all,
    I have always received very good help on this forum so I am going to try and keep that streak alive. Can someone please tell me how to record my sets using garageband and my NS6. I have recorded using it before but I am not sure if I am selecting the right options. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    #41404

    VinnyBlanc
    Participant

    Any particular reason you are recording with GarageBand instead of Serato?

    #41406

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    VinnyBlanc, post: 41561, member: 737 wrote: Any particular reason you are recording with GarageBand instead of Serato?

    VinnyBlanc, post: 41561, member: 737 wrote: Any particular reason you are recording with GarageBand instead of Serato?

    Yes, because Garageband has a lot more features to help with editing. Other than recording the set, you cannot do anything else with it. You would need another program(like GarageBand) to edit the set before sharing.

    #41414

    DJ Vintage
    Moderator

    Uhm … doesn’t Serato let you record a stereo wav-file? If so, you can import that in any DAW or mastering program and do whatever post-production work you need to do. Logic, Ableton, Cubase, ProTools, can all do the stuff you want. And, guessing from your comments, Garageband has some wanted features as well.

    Standalone suites like WaveLab (Steinberg) and Ozone (Izotope) are great tools, but aren’t exactly free.

    Greetinx,
    C.

    #41430

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    Chuck van Eekelen, post: 41571, member: 2756 wrote: Uhm … doesn’t Serato let you record a stereo wav-file? If so, you can import that in any DAW or mastering program and do whatever post-production work you need to do. Logic, Ableton, Cubase, ProTools, can all do the stuff you want. And, guessing from your comments, Garageband has some wanted features as well.

    Standalone suites like WaveLab (Steinberg) and Ozone (Izotope) are great tools, but aren’t exactly free.

    Greetinx,
    C.

    Good point Chuck,
    Right now when I am practicing I am using the speakers connected to my master output. I want to get speakers to practice with that will sound better. Can you give me some suggestions?

    #41431

    DJ Vintage
    Moderator

    That is a hornet’s nest LOL. Highly personal choice. Depends largely on your exact set of wishes and demands on the one hand and your budget on the other.

    If you want to practice and want it to sound close to club PA equipment, getting smallish (10″) active PA speakers might be your best bet. They will be also be suited to do small house and garden parties and general moving around. A couple hundred bucks should get you something nice with stands.

    If you want to do more mastering and have an overall more “true” sound, a set of studio monitors would be better. Realise thought that studio monitors (in general) will be more tiring to listen to, due exactly to their “true sound” character. Also they are not made for long time, high level volume listening (bad idea anyway, unless you fancy lots of whistling in your ears in later years – tinnitus).

    A good monitor with a user-friendly price tag is the KRK Rokit series. 5″s are ok (lacking a tad in the lows for real production work, but I have been using them for years and they suite me fine), 6″s are definitely a little beefier. 8″s are nice but are way too big physically for my taste as near-field monitors.

    There are a few “rules” to setting up monitor speakers, but other than that it’s pretty straight forward.

    What many people tend to forget, (and this is not important for practicing DJ-ing, but is paramount for good production work), is the acoustics of the room you will be using. No amount of speaker quality or EQ-ing can compensate for a “nasty” room. And when it comes to acoustic treatment of a room, you’ll need loads of specific knowledge, (usually expensive) materials and quite often structural work. So, before you invest heavily in a set of really nice monitor speakers, it may be an idea to look at the room first. You CAN compensate for room acoustics in your producing/mixing/monitoring, but it makes your job a lot harder.

    We’ve said it here before: “if only there was an easy answer” :-).

    Greetinx,
    C.

    #41442

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    Thanks Chuck,

    Here is what I am looking to do:
    I play in smaller venue clubs/lounges and use my headphones for cueing and also to listen to my actual mix. I am trying to set up a small home practice studio with decent quality speakers for listening and playing. I don’t think studio monitors are what I need based on your explanation. Also, when I am mixing in my headphones, that’s actually how the mix sounds to my audience correct? No delay correct? Thanks again for taking the time to answer my questions.

    #41443

    DJ Vintage
    Moderator

    Hi,

    Yep, headphone is no delay, both your cue and your master sound hit your ears at the same time.

    I can tell you how my setup is. I have a Numark NPM-100 (not the 5!), just one – I can’t see the added value in a stereo setup – that I have on a microphone stand. I can angle it towards my ear and set it on a height I prefer, which in my case is about halfway up my chest and angled upwards. It takes RCA and combo (Jack/XLR), has a mic/line setting and volume control. Puts out 100W RMS into two fullrange 5″ speakers. The good thing about that (as opposed to an 8″or 10″ with a small tweeter) is that this keeps it to a small (although not extremely lightweight) form factor.

    For me practicality was the major factor, sound quality a clear second. Having said that, I think they sound ok, definitely loud enough and with enough low punch and high clarity (after all you really only need the bass and clap/hi-hat/snare for mixing) to fulfil my wishes.

    I want my practice setup to mimick what I do in real life, so one speaker, one side headphone is a real as I need it.

    The absolute kicker for me is that I toss it in the car when I go somewhere and if there is not booth monitor, I take it out, set it down, plug it in and I have my own booth monitor with me. Easy. And I have a spare speaker if something goes wrong :-).

    I position it on the opposite side of where I keep my cans and turn down the volume (have a booth control on my mixer and on my controller) when I am done prepping til the moment I actually do the mix. No delay, clear sound and I don’t lock every other sound out as I would wearing my full headphone when doing the mix.

    Again, this is my setup. You might check out and preferably listen to the NPM100 and see if this might work for you.

    Greetinx,
    C.

    #41445

    Anthony Lewis
    Participant

    You are the best!!! Thank you for all of your help. We are moving to a larger space soon and I will be able to set up in a spare bedroom(super excited about this) these seem to be what I am looking for. Thanks again. I will keep you posted and send a picot my set up once we get to that point.

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